ASU Library

Last Event: Wednesday Feb. 7 10 a.m. - 11 a.m.
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In this 60 minute webinar, ASU Library will provide an introduction to U.S. Copyright with an emphasis on educational situations.

Specifically, the library will discuss current classroom exceptions, such as the Technology Education and Copyright Harmonization Act, as well as an overview of fair use.

Finally, the library will give examples of how copyright applies to common educational uses and provide time for questions.

 

Online

For More Information Contact:

Anali Perry
ASU Library
anali.perry@asu.edu

Last Event: Monday Jan. 29 All Day

Art of Jeremy Yocum

Repeats every day until Sun Apr 29 2018.

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The work of Phoenix artist Jeremy Yocum is now on display at the Polytechnic campus Library. 

An arts educator for nearly 20 years, Yocum has taught all ages and many different subjects in the arts. Along with teaching high school students, he currently teaches printmaking to adults at the Mesa Arts Center and Xico, Inc. Arte y Cultura.

Yocum is a working artist who enjoys creating pieces with bright, bold colors. Some of his subjects include animals, creatures and objects of pop culture from the 1980s. His pieces can be seen around the Valley, in restaurants and galleries, and he regularly participates in First Friday in downtown Phoenix.

 

Jeremy Yocum

Academic Center, Polytechnic campus Library

For More Information Contact:

Katherine Sullivan
ASU Library
Katherine.M.Sullivan@asu.edu

Last Event: Monday Jan. 29 All Day

Vault Gallery: Visual Artist Swapna Das

Repeats every day until Sun May 13 2018.

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The visual art of Swapna Das is now on display in the Vault Gallery of the Downtown Phoenix campus Library. It will be on exhibit through May 11 during regular library hours.

Born and raised in New Delhi, India, Das moved to the United States in 2011 and completed her Master of Fine Arts at Arizona State University, where she discovered she was able to share her diverse background through art while enhancing her skills and knowledge through meaningful interaction with other talented artists.

Das states that her paintings and drawings “encompass the profound idea that spirituality and creativity are intertwined.” Her current body of work illustrates one of the significant concepts of Buddhism titled “Ten World,” or ten life states that a person experiences in his or her life. The illustration of these different aspects of "Ten Worlds" has provided her with an opportunity to understand human inherent potential to transform their life condition.

Not only is her latest work an extension of "Ten Worlds," but it also depicts her personal experience of undergoing the lower state of life. The series of circle shape monochrome drawings are the representation of collective emotions of distress and vulnerability.

“It was intriguing to create complex and abstract graphical elements enveloped into circular shaped drawings,” Das wrote. “All life is in a constant state of flux, yet there exists a discernable pattern and a strong connection between various human emotions. This interconnected network of human emotion is shown through organic and flexible elements resembling tubes, strings and cords entangling with each other.”

“The abstraction of elements also depicts that human life is full of intricacy and inconsistency,” she continued. “They also represent the unpleasant phase of low life condition in which a human loses the control in their life.”

Das acknowledges there can be many interpretations of her paintings and charcoal drawings. She believes through her art “the audience can experience the freedom of the limited palate which will provide a platform to appreciate the connection between art and human development.”

Swapna Das art

University Center, Downtown Phoenix campus Library

For More Information Contact:

Jackie Young
ASU Library
Jacqueline.Young@asu.edu

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ASU Library’s Special Collections recently acquired a treasure trove of early printed editions of Geoffrey Chaucer’s texts, including the third edition of his "Works" by William Thynne (1550). Later holdings include a rare copy of "The Kelmscott Chaucer," printed in 1896 by William Morris, and a guide to the creation of this beautiful volume with early sketches by Edward Burne-Jones. Following an overview of the Chaucer holdings, you will have the opportunity to examine them personally.

About the Chaucer Celebration

The ASU Department of English's biennial Chaucer Celebration commemorates the life and work of medieval author Geoffrey Chaucer with events such as film festivals, concerts, performances and academic discussions.

In 2018, the celebration brings the medieval writer into the 21st century, hosting poet Patience Agbabi ("Telling Tales") and YA novelist Kim Zarins ("Sometimes We Tell the Truth") in readings from their Chaucer-inspired works; an exhibition of ASU Library's new Chauceriana acquisitions; and a dramatic reading of a short play that updates "The Canterbury Tales," written and directed by Pamela Sterling, an associate professor in the ASU Herberger Institute's School of Film, Dance and Theatre.

More details at the ASU Chaucer Celebration website.

Page from Thynne edition of Chaucer / Photo by Richard Newhauser

Hayden Library, room C55

For More Information Contact:

Richard Newhauser
Department of English
Richard.Newhauser@asu.edu
480-965-8139 https://english.clas.asu.edu/chaucer-celebration

Last Event: Saturday Jan. 13 All Day
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This exhibition utilizes the visual arts to unmask how society reflects values, ideas and beliefs concerning social challenges which inspire contemporary visual artworks seen at this site from both professional artists and student artists. 

"Stories are how we organize our thoughts and experiences and how we share them with others. Community developers and teachers can work with public artists to help students tell their stories: art can act to build solidarity/alliances and can be a prelude to community action." Hustedde, R. J., 1998, "On the soul of community development", Journal of the Community Development Society Journal, 29:2, pp. 153-165. 

There will be a community and students' reception from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Friday, Feb. 2, at Fletcher Library, to highlight the community partner artworks of the art students from South Mountain High School Magnet Arts Program.

January exhibit

Fletcher Library, second and third floors

For More Information Contact:

Margaret Rodriguez
ASU Library
Margaret.Rodriguez@asu.edu

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Ernest Sickey, chairman of the Coushatta Tribe of Louisana from 1973 to 1985 and a trailblazer in the evolution of Indian affairs in the southeastern United States, visits Arizona State University Feb. 7–9 and will present a public talk on Thursday, Feb. 8. 

Sickey held leadership roles for the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana for nearly three decades. He led his own community from legal obscurity to becoming the first tribe to be recognized by the state (1972), one of the only tribes in the nation to be recognized by the Department of Interior through administrative channels (1973), and laid the foundation for multiple economic ventures that have since placed the Coushatta among the state’s top private employers.

In addition to his efforts in advocating for his own community, Sickey lobbied the Louisiana legislature to create an Office of Indian Affairs, which he served as the first executive director. He was also among the founders of the Louisiana Inter-Tribal Council and Institute for Indian Development. Today, Louisiana is home to four federally recognized and ten state recognized tribes.

A key player in the broader regional movement in promoting Indigenous rights, Sickey was among the original members of the United Southern and Eastern Tribes (USEC). He testified before Congress, led efforts in establishing legal precedents around land claims and tribal jurisdiction, and has spoken before United Nations panels.

Coushatta tribal leader and activist Ernest Sickey

ASU Memorial Union, Pima room 230

Download flyer
Free and open to the public

For More Information Contact:

Denise Bates, Assistant Professor
Leadership and Interdisciplinary Studies, College of Integrative Sciences and Arts
Denise.Bates@asu.edu

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The film series "Post-Soviet Cinema: Art, Dissent and Social Justice" will showcase three recent films from the former Soviet countries, which articulate topical cultural and political concerns with global resonance.

The Thursday Nov. 16 screening will feature a documentary about the 2014 civil unrest in Ukraine, and it will be accompanied by a presentation by the director Olha Onyshko and a commentary by Professor Mark von Hagen.

The Festival overall is part of Professor Ana Hedberg Olenina's Fall 2017 course RUS/SLC/FMS 494 "Post-Soviet Cinema: Art, Dissent and Social Justice," and the students in this course will be actively involved in preparing the festival materials (promotional flyers, social media ads) as well short oral introductions for each film.

 

Durham Language and Literature, room LL2

For More Information Contact:

Murphy McGary
School of International Letters and Cultures
Murphy.mcgary@asu.edu
480-965-4674 http://www.silc.asu.edu

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The film series "Post-Soviet Cinema: Art, Dissent and Social Justice" will showcase three recent films from the former Soviet countries, which articulate topical cultural and political concerns with global resonance.

The Thursday Nov. 16 screening will feature a documentary about the 2014 civil unrest in Ukraine, and it will be accompanied by a presentation by the director Olha Onyshko and a commentary by Professor Mark von Hagen.

The Festival overall is part of Professor Ana Hedberg Olenina's Fall 2017 course RUS/SLC/FMS 494 "Post-Soviet Cinema: Art, Dissent and Social Justice," and the students in this course will be actively involved in preparing the festival materials (promotional flyers, social media ads) as well short oral introductions for each film.

The series is thus an education opportunity for the class, and it is also means to attract a wide audience on campus and attract potential students' attention to post-Soviet art and politics — with the hope of increasing the number of enrollees in the Russian major and minor.

Durham Language and Literature Building, room LL 2

For More Information Contact:

Murphy McGary
School of International Letters and Cultures
Murphy.mcgary@asu.edu
480-965-4674 http://www.silc.asu.edu

Last Event: Monday Nov. 6 8 a.m. - 8 p.m.
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Stop by Fletcher Library during Salute to Service week to take in two exhibits that are tributes to those that have served and sacrificed for our country: A Vietnam photo exhibit and the Arizona Traveling Memorial.

Fletcher Library

For More Information Contact:

Margaret Rodriguez
Fletcher Library
Margaret.Rodriguez@asu.edu
602-543-8505

Last Event: Tuesday Nov. 14 6 p.m. - 9 p.m.
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Myron Dewey (Newe-Numah/Paiute-Shoshone), a filmmaker, activist, journalist and educator, is the featured speaker in the fall 2017 Simon Ortiz and Labriola Center Lecture on Indigenous Land, Culture and Community.

The series features two screenings of Dewey's film, "Awake: A Dream from Standing Rock": the first on Monday, Nov. 13 at Sun Devil Marketplace/College Ave. Commons in Tempe and the second on Tuesday, Nov. 14 at the Heard Museum in Phoenix. Both events begin with a reception at 6 p.m. followed by the film at 6:45 p.m. Dewey will be present for a Q & A after the screenings, which are free of charge and open to the public.

Dewey is from the Walker River Paiute Tribe, Agui Diccutta Band (Trout Eaters) on his father’s side and Bishop Paiute Tribe on his mother’s side. He is founder and owner of Digital Smoke Signals, a social media and film company. He holds an Associate degree and Bachelor of Science from Haskell Indian Nations University and a Master of Arts from the University of Kansas.

 A Dream from Standing Rock""Awake: A Dream from Standing Rock," which Dewey co-directed with Josh Fox and James Spione, chronicles the #NoDAPL peaceful protests on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota. Premiering at the Tribeca Film Festival in 2017, the film has been called “powerful” by the Hollywood Reporter and “an evocative wake-up call told as a visual poem” by IndieWire. "Awake" does not follow a single protagonist but instead forms a “pastiche” of narrative, mostly indigenous voices. Dewey’s drone footage adds both immediacy and perspective, making him “one of the most closely followed journalists to come out of the movement” (IndieWire). For Dewey’s work, "Awake" won the Special Founders Prize for Citizen Journalism at the 2017 Traverse City Film Festival – the festival founded by legendary documentarian Michael Moore.

The Simon Ortiz and Labriola Center Lecture on Indigenous Land, Culture and Community at Arizona State University addresses topics and issues across disciplines in the arts, humanities, sciences and politics. Underscoring Indigenous American experiences and perspectives, this series seeks to create and celebrate knowledge that evolves from an inclusive Indigenous worldview and that is applicable to all walks of life.

ASU sponsors include the American Indian Studies Program, ASU Library, Department of English, Labriola National American Indian Data Center, Office of American Indian Initiatives and Red Ink Initiative. The Heard Museum is a community partner.

Myron Dewey / Courtesy photo

Heard Museum, Steele Auditorium

2301 N. Central Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85004

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