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The film series "Post-Soviet Cinema: Art, Dissent and Social Justice" will showcase three recent films from the former Soviet countries, which articulate topical cultural and political concerns with global resonance.

The Thursday Nov. 16 screening will feature a documentary about the 2014 civil unrest in Ukraine, and it will be accompanied by a presentation by the director Olha Onyshko and a commentary by Professor Mark von Hagen.

The Festival overall is part of Professor Ana Hedberg Olenina's Fall 2017 course RUS/SLC/FMS 494 "Post-Soviet Cinema: Art, Dissent and Social Justice," and the students in this course will be actively involved in preparing the festival materials (promotional flyers, social media ads) as well short oral introductions for each film.

 

Durham Language and Literature, room LL2

For More Information Contact:

Murphy McGary
School of International Letters and Cultures
Murphy.mcgary@asu.edu
480-965-4674 http://www.silc.asu.edu

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The film series "Post-Soviet Cinema: Art, Dissent and Social Justice" will showcase three recent films from the former Soviet countries, which articulate topical cultural and political concerns with global resonance.

The Thursday Nov. 16 screening will feature a documentary about the 2014 civil unrest in Ukraine, and it will be accompanied by a presentation by the director Olha Onyshko and a commentary by Professor Mark von Hagen.

The Festival overall is part of Professor Ana Hedberg Olenina's Fall 2017 course RUS/SLC/FMS 494 "Post-Soviet Cinema: Art, Dissent and Social Justice," and the students in this course will be actively involved in preparing the festival materials (promotional flyers, social media ads) as well short oral introductions for each film.

The series is thus an education opportunity for the class, and it is also means to attract a wide audience on campus and attract potential students' attention to post-Soviet art and politics — with the hope of increasing the number of enrollees in the Russian major and minor.

Durham Language and Literature Building, room LL 2

For More Information Contact:

Murphy McGary
School of International Letters and Cultures
Murphy.mcgary@asu.edu
480-965-4674 http://www.silc.asu.edu

Last Event: Monday Nov. 6 8 a.m. - 8 p.m.
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Stop by Fletcher Library during Salute to Service week to take in two exhibits that are tributes to those that have served and sacrificed for our country: A Vietnam photo exhibit and the Arizona Traveling Memorial.

Fletcher Library

For More Information Contact:

Margaret Rodriguez
Fletcher Library
Margaret.Rodriguez@asu.edu
602-543-8505

Last Event: Tuesday Nov. 14 6 p.m. - 9 p.m.
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Myron Dewey (Newe-Numah/Paiute-Shoshone), a filmmaker, activist, journalist and educator, is the featured speaker in the fall 2017 Simon Ortiz and Labriola Center Lecture on Indigenous Land, Culture and Community.

The series features two screenings of Dewey's film, "Awake: A Dream from Standing Rock": the first on Monday, Nov. 13 at Sun Devil Marketplace/College Ave. Commons in Tempe and the second on Tuesday, Nov. 14 at the Heard Museum in Phoenix. Both events begin with a reception at 6 p.m. followed by the film at 6:45 p.m. Dewey will be present for a Q & A after the screenings, which are free of charge and open to the public.

Dewey is from the Walker River Paiute Tribe, Agui Diccutta Band (Trout Eaters) on his father’s side and Bishop Paiute Tribe on his mother’s side. He is founder and owner of Digital Smoke Signals, a social media and film company. He holds an Associate degree and Bachelor of Science from Haskell Indian Nations University and a Master of Arts from the University of Kansas.

 A Dream from Standing Rock""Awake: A Dream from Standing Rock," which Dewey co-directed with Josh Fox and James Spione, chronicles the #NoDAPL peaceful protests on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota. Premiering at the Tribeca Film Festival in 2017, the film has been called “powerful” by the Hollywood Reporter and “an evocative wake-up call told as a visual poem” by IndieWire. "Awake" does not follow a single protagonist but instead forms a “pastiche” of narrative, mostly indigenous voices. Dewey’s drone footage adds both immediacy and perspective, making him “one of the most closely followed journalists to come out of the movement” (IndieWire). For Dewey’s work, "Awake" won the Special Founders Prize for Citizen Journalism at the 2017 Traverse City Film Festival – the festival founded by legendary documentarian Michael Moore.

The Simon Ortiz and Labriola Center Lecture on Indigenous Land, Culture and Community at Arizona State University addresses topics and issues across disciplines in the arts, humanities, sciences and politics. Underscoring Indigenous American experiences and perspectives, this series seeks to create and celebrate knowledge that evolves from an inclusive Indigenous worldview and that is applicable to all walks of life.

ASU sponsors include the American Indian Studies Program, ASU Library, Department of English, Labriola National American Indian Data Center, Office of American Indian Initiatives and Red Ink Initiative. The Heard Museum is a community partner.

Myron Dewey / Courtesy photo

Heard Museum, Steele Auditorium

2301 N. Central Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85004

Last Event: Monday Nov. 13 6 p.m. - 9 p.m.
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Myron Dewey (Newe-Numah/Paiute-Shoshone), a filmmaker, activist, journalist and educator, is the featured speaker in the fall 2017 Simon Ortiz and Labriola Center Lecture on Indigenous Land, Culture and Community.

The series features two screenings of Dewey's film, "Awake: A Dream from Standing Rock": the first on Monday, Nov. 13 at Sun Devil Marketplace/College Ave. Commons in Tempe and the second on Tuesday, Nov. 14 at the Heard Museum in Phoenix. Both events begin with a reception at 6 p.m. followed by the film at 6:45 p.m. Dewey will be present for a Q & A after the screenings, which are free of charge and open to the public.

Dewey is from the Walker River Paiute Tribe, Agui Diccutta Band (Trout Eaters) on his father’s side and Bishop Paiute Tribe on his mother’s side. He is founder and owner of Digital Smoke Signals, a social media and film company. He holds an Associate degree and Bachelor of Science from Haskell Indian Nations University and a Master of Arts from the University of Kansas.

Poster for "Awake: A Dream from Standing Rock""Awake: A Dream from Standing Rock," which Dewey co-directed with Josh Fox and James Spione, chronicles the #NoDAPL peaceful protests on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota. Premiering at the Tribeca Film Festival in 2017, the film has been called “powerful” by the Hollywood Reporter and “an evocative wake-up call told as a visual poem” by IndieWire. "Awake" does not follow a single protagonist but instead forms a “pastiche” of narrative, mostly indigenous voices. Dewey’s drone footage adds both immediacy and perspective, making him “one of the most closely followed journalists to come out of the movement” (IndieWire). For Dewey’s work, "Awake" won the Special Founders Prize for Citizen Journalism at the 2017 Traverse City Film Festival – the festival founded by legendary documentarian Michael Moore.

The Simon Ortiz and Labriola Center Lecture on Indigenous Land, Culture and Community at Arizona State University addresses topics and issues across disciplines in the arts, humanities, sciences and politics. Underscoring Indigenous American experiences and perspectives, this series seeks to create and celebrate knowledge that evolves from an inclusive Indigenous worldview and that is applicable to all walks of life.

ASU sponsors include the American Indian Studies Program, ASU Library, Department of English, Labriola National American Indian Data Center, Office of American Indian Initiatives and Red Ink Initiative. The Heard Museum is a community partner.

Myron Dewey / Courtesy photo

College Avenue Commons

Last Event: Wednesday Oct. 18 All Day

Pleurants

Repeats every day until Mon Dec 18 2017.

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A new exhibit at Fletcher Library features a collection of paintings by artist Shelley Whiting, an alumnus of Arizona State University.

Artist statement:
Pleurants were mourning figures that decorated tombs in the Middle Ages. I was drawn to them by seeing their sad eyes and frowning lips. In these paintings, the various-sized pleurant figures are cut out and standing next to each other, with tiny sculptures of toothpaste behind them. Toothpaste used to be in metal tubes, but is now packaged in plastic. Religion often changes in a similar manner as to how everyday objects change. The figures are mourning that adjustment.

My art is influenced by caricature and mural art. When I was fifteen years old, I realized that realism did not capture the emotion or essence of the human experience. So I took a sketch pad and started experimenting with methods of distorting faces. I remember being fascinated by the caricatures of celebrities in Entertainment Weekly. Some were Cubist-inspired and others were more illustrative. After a year of painting celebrity caricatures I started creating caricatures of everyday people, which is what I do today.

I was born into a Mormon family of six children. My family was very active in the church growing up and I can't forget a Sunday where we weren't at church. I grew up in a creative household of writers and artists. My mother was a Mormon historian and published an article in the New Era, a popular Mormon magazine. My twin is a successful short story writer who has published over the internet and in zines. My brother makes his living with grants and helps out with community murals. I was influenced to be an artist with seeing my brother draw around the house. I started drawing when I was twelve but I didn't take art seriously until I was 17, when I realized a fascination for caricature, and later painting things big. Now I spend five to six days a week at Warehouse 1005, an art studio and gallery in the Phoenix art district. I am able to talk about my mental illness and cope with my symptoms through my art. I usually paint one picture a week, and am busy showing art projects around the valley in local businesses and galleries.

My current work consists of portraits, mostly representative of myself, but sometimes caricatures of other people and their inner lives. Lately I have been creating paintings that represent the roles that I play in my life. My recent paintings represent how I might be perceived by my peers coupled with the complicated nature how I view myself. I use my work as a means of defining my spiritual beliefs and my attempts at connecting with the spirituality and individuality of others.

While I have struggled with mental health issues since a very young age, in the past decade I have begun to comprehend through professional help my dual-diagnosis of bipolar disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder. That dual-diagnosis, on the other hand, does not fully explain what I feel and experience and I still struggle to choose what, if any labels define who I am. As of right now I use art as a form of catharsis. I pour my raw and vulnerable feelings into my work and really don’t care about the comfortability of my work to an audience.  I hope the work will show my pain, and that the audience will sympathize with the often depressed and often silly nature of who I am.

For more information, visit shellwhiting.blogspot.com

Pleurants

Fletcher Library, second floor

For More Information Contact:

Margaret Rodriguez
ASU Library
margaret.rodriguez@asu.edu

Last Event: Tuesday Nov. 7 noon - 2 p.m.
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 We share it, grow it, eat it and celebrate it in our traditions. Food is the foundation of our lives.

So what can we do to ensure there is diversity in our food and that we will have access to it in the future?

Join us for lunch and conversation with local food experts to learn about how to make local agriculture and community and home gardening part of your life. We will learn about seeds, community gardens and local agriculture, as well as what we can do to keep our food diverse. Garden seeds from Arizona State University's seed library will also be available.

After the panel discussion, attendees will break into smaller groups to explore the needs and demands of supporting a local food system.

Panelists include:

Kenny Barrett, owner and manager of the Roosevelt Growhouse. He will discuss his work to bring urban agriculture to downtown Phoenix. Through the Roosevelt Growhouse, he has created gardens and community in the most unlikely places.

Netra Chhetri, ASU's School of Sustainability, School for the Future of Innovation in Society and Food Systems Transformation Initiative.
His expertise lies in the area of climate adaptation, energy and water, agriculture and food security, vulnerability assessment, grassroots innovation, participatory development and citizen engagement. A common thread of his scholarship sits in the nexus of science and society and the scope of his work is by its nature both local and global.

Melissa Kruse-Peeples, education and outreach coordinator with the Native Seeds/SEARCH.
Peeples received her doctorate from ASU in anthropology from the School of Human Evolution and Social Change. She will talk about her work and the mission of the NSS to provide new life for ancient crops through the cultivation and sharing of native seeds.

Christopher Wharton, ASU's School of Nutrition and Health Promotion and Food Systems Transformation Initiative.
Wharton's research focuses on connecting locally and regionally produced foods with those who need it the most. Focusing on improving healthy food access for underserved populations, students in his lab work with farmers, farmers' markets, community-supported agriculture programs and food hubs to identify effective, efficient and sustainable models for healthy food distribution.

This event is sponsored by ASU Library, School for the Future of Innovation in Society and Defend our Future.

Seed Library

Hayden Library, room C55

For More Information Contact:

René Tanner
ASU Library
rene.tanner@asu.edu

Last Event: Tuesday Oct. 17 All Day
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A new multimedia installation at ASU Library is calling attention to the 100-year anniversary of the “forgotten pandemic,” a worldwide influenza which killed more people between 1918-1920 than were collectively killed in World War I, World War II, the Korean War and Vietnam. 

A unique, self-guided tour of experiential data, "Counting the Dead" aims to re-embody Arizona’s influenza mortality data from one century ago, illustrating the ways in which illness had spread across our then young state.

Developed by ASU scholars Elizabeth Grumbach and Jacqueline Wernimont, the exhibit highlights innovative methods to represent data sets in three dimensional space, including sonification and haptics, offering visitors alternative ways of understanding — through feeling and hearing — the unfolding of influenza in time and space.

Grumbach is the project manager of the Nexus Lab, a digital research co-op within ASU’s Institute for Humanites Research, and Wernimont is an assistant professor in the Department of English and the director of the Nexus Lab.

Comfort and wellness food will be served from 2 to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 17, in Hayden Library, along with other offered wellness resources, in celebration of the exhibition launch.

Counting the Dead: Arizona and the Forgotten Pandemic

Hayden Library, room C2

For More Information Contact:

Patty Odle
ASU Library
patricia.odle@asu.edu
http://lib.asu.edu

Last Event: Wednesday Sept. 13 All Day

Stories in Color: The Art of Oliverio Balcells

A special reception for this exhibit will take place from 5:30 to 7 p.m. on Sept. 14 on the third floor atrium of Fletcher Library.

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A reflection of different experiences reflected through the colorful art that tells stories.

Oliverio Balcells is a scholar of the ancient Mesoamerican cultures as well as as a photographer, painter and musician. He is a native of Guadalajara, Mexico and moved to Arizona in 1999.

He creates contemporary art. “I’m interested in social themes like history, culture, human potential development, symbolism and nature. I use self-expression to inspire people in the present moment through paintings, music, photos and films. My influences stem from ancient Mexican manifestations, Wixarika (Huichol) art, the Mexican master muralists and the golden age of Mexican cinema,” Balcells said.

In 2016, he was a selected artist for the In Flux Cycle 6 for the city of Tempe to paint a mural on Apache Boulevard. In 2012, he was selected by the city of Tempe Public Art Program to design and paint a utility box on Mill Avenue. The image was also made into a library card for the city of Tempe. In 2008, Oliverio was awarded first place at the Arte Latino en la Ciudad XII at the Phoenix Center for the Arts, and in 1999, he was awarded Best Artist in the seventh annual Plastic Arts Exhibit of Cancun.

His work has been featured as a cover for a book from the author Ruth Gomber-Munoz, "Labor and Legality: An Ethnography of a Mexican Immigrant Worker," published by the Oxford University Press, Inc. in New York City.

He has done several workshops for XicoInc’s cultural arts program for youth, CALA’s Diego Community Arts Program with Child's Play as an artist in residence in schools throughout Phoenix, created a community garden mural with Free Arts of Arizona and their Professional Artist Series at the Challenger Middle School. He has also been a teaching artist with Arizona Commission on the Arts, creating a portable mural with the students of Mercury Mine Elementary School in Paradise Valley, Arizona and recently participated in an interactive workshops called the “Eagle Sun in Motion” with the International Sonoran Desert Alliance, Vision Gallery and ASU West.

Oliverio Balcells received his bachelor’s degree in graphic design from the Univa University in Guadalajara, Mexico.

For more information, visit http://oliveriobalcells.com

Fletcher Library art exhibit

Fletcher Library, third floor

For More Information Contact:

Margaret Rodriguez
ASU Library
margaret.rodriguez@asu.edu

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Long before #TakeAKnee protests, the movement against Native American mascots, derogatory team naming and cultural appropriation in sports proved a catalyst for discussion and debate about race and democracy in American culture. “More Than a Word” offers an inside look at these contentious issues through the campaign and legal cases against the Washington R*skins, and traces how racist terminology became embraced and beloved by sports teams and fans.

Join us for a screening and discussion that will explore the personal and social costs of America’s history of misappropriating cultural identities for the purposes of entertainment.

Panelists:

  • Amanda Blackhorse, LCSW (Diné), Social Worker, Lead Plaintiff in Blackhorse et al v.Pro-Football Inc, and Founder of Arizona to Rally Native American Mascots
  • Jacob Meders, MFA (Mechoopda), Master Printmaker and Assistant Professor, New College, ASU
  • James Riding In, PhD (Pawnee), Interim Director and Associate Professor, American Indian Studies, ASU


About the Film:

"More Than A Word" analyzes the Washington football team and their use of the derogatory term R*dskins. Using interviews from both those in favor of changing the name and those against, "More Than A Word" presents a deeper analysis of the many issues surrounding the Washington team name. The documentary also examines the history of Native American cultural appropriation. To learn more about the film, visit http://morethanawordfilm.com/

More Than A Word Image

Phoenix Indian School Visitors Center, Steele Indian School Park

300 E. Indian School Rd., Phoenix

For More Information Contact:

Center for the Study of Race and Democracy
csrd@asu.edu
602-496-1376 https://csrd.asu.edu/

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