Capturing the 'Experimental Effect': A Field Experiment to Test the Effects of Experimental Games on Collective Action and Self-Governance

Capturing the 'Experimental Effect': A Field Experiment to Test the Effects of Experimental Games on Collective Action and Self-Governance

Monday, March 25, 12 p.m.

Human Evolution and Social Change
Location: Wrigley Hall, 201
Campus: Tempe           
Cost: Free

All are welcome to attend this latest Center for the Study of Institutional Diversity brown bag featuring Nathan Rollins.
 
Light refreshments will be served.
 
Field experiments have become a popular tool for measuring collective action in its natural environment--in communities where residents wrestle with the challenges of cooperation and collective action, such as in managing local natural resources. These experiments permit researchers to systematically test for regularities in how communities manage social dilemmas.
 
For a number of years, field experimenters have noted anecdotal evidence that groups of individuals that participate in these experiments sometimes experience changes in their prosocial behaviors. The process of experimental measurement itself can lead to changes in behavior and institutional structures as an "experimenter effect." This effect holds profound implications--positive and negative--for the role of experiments in International Development and Experimental Economics. This presentation describes a research project currently underway in India, testing the "experimenter's effect" in a controlled study with villages wrestling with groundwater management challenges. The project aims to leverage the potential for experimental games as an intervention, to demonstrate field experiments can be used as a tool for generating positive changes in collective action.


For more information
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: Center for the Study of Institutional Diversity
Phone: 480-965-8318

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