ASU Library

Last Event: Tuesday April 24 3 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
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Please join ASU Library for a special reception and Q&A with Elizabeth Hoover, the Manning assistant professor of American studies at Brown University, who has been chosen as the winner of the 10th Annual Labriola Center American Indian National Book Award for her book, "The River Is In Us: Fighting Toxics In a Mohawk Community" (University of Minnesota Press).

The Labriola book award recognizes and promotes indigenous scholars and scholarship on topics and issues that are pertinent to Indigenous people and nations. This year, LeAnne Betasamosake Simpson was awarded "Honorable Mention" for her book, "As We Have Always Done: Indigenous Freedom Through Radical Resistance" (University of Minnesota Press).

A Q&A session with the author will be led by David Martinez, the chair of the judging committee and an associate professor of American Indian Studies at Arizona State University.

Light refreshments will be served.

 

Elizabeth Hoover

Hayden Library, room C2

For More Information Contact:

Patty Odle
ASU Library
patricia.odle@asu.edu

Last Event: Tuesday April 3 All Day
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Arizona State University's Fletcher Library proudly presents "Young at Heart," a month-long exhibit featuring the artwork of the Glendale Union High School District’s students and faculty.

A public reception for this art exhibit will be held on from 5–7 p.m on April 12. It is a gala affair to celebrate the talents of these gifted student and faculty artists. On display, the exhibit features approximately 80 pieces of the very best student artwork from all nine schools in the Glendale Union High School District. I

n addition to the students’ artwork, teachers from around the district will have pieces on display. The art will include drawings, paintings, mixed media, 3-D art and photography. Some artwork will be available for sale.

art exhibit

Fletcher Library, second and third floors

For More Information Contact:

Margaret Rodriguez
ASU Library
margaret.rodriguez@asu.edu

Last Event: Tuesday March 27 noon - 6 p.m.
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Virtual reality appeared as early as the late 19th century, and began to take off in the 1950s. Recent technological developments in hardware and software have given way to more accessible and immersive virtual reality experiences. 

With the goal of providing students with the collaborative spaces and tools they need to bring their ideas to life, ASU Library's mkrspace presents a virtual reality (VR) exhibit to demonstrate the technology's potential in advancing education among other disciplines and areas of interest, such as digital tourism, disability studies, and the health and medical profession. 

ASU's Garret Yates, an undergraduate student in the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering, will be leading the VR demo, which includes more than 20 scenarios that will enable the ASU community to experience everything from what it's like to be at the bottom of the sea to the top of Mount Everest. 

Hardware to be used in the demo includes a custom personal computer, HTC Vive VR kit (with stands), Bluetooth headphones, a 28 inch monitor (with speakers), a keyboard, mouse and Xbox controller.

Come experience virtual reality at Hayden Library! 

Virtual Reality

Hayden Library lower concourse, next to makerspace

For More Information Contact:

Victor Surovec
ASU Library
victor.k.surovec@asu.edu

Last Event: Friday April 27 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.
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Latinos, African-Americans, Asian-Americans and the LGBT community make up more than 42 percent of Arizona’s population but are only represented in 0–2 percent of known archival collections.

Learn how to scan archival material and preserve your personal and community stories!

ASU Library staff will scan 50 items per person for free! Using StoryCenter listening stations, people will also learn how to conduct an oral history interview and have the option of recording their own stories during the course of the day.

 

Oral History Day

Alston House

453 N. Pima, Mesa, AZ

For More Information Contact:

Nancy Godoy
ASU Library
nancy.godoy@asu.edu

Last Event: Wednesday April 25 6 p.m. - 8 p.m.
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Latinos, African-Americans, Asian-Americans and the LGBT community make up more than 42 percent of Arizona’s population, but are only represented in 0–2 percent of known archival collections. Learn how to be a Community Archivist for underrepresented communities.

ASU Library staff will show individuals how to appraise, arrange and describe archival material (e.g. photographs or correspondence) in order to preserve it for future generations. Each participant will receive a free “Archive Starter Kit” that contains preservation information and archival supplies (acid-free box, folders, mylar, and gloves).

Archives & Preservation Workshop

AE England Building

For More Information Contact:

Nancy Godoy
ASU Library
nancy.godoy@asu.edu

Last Event: Friday April 20 5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
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Latinos, African-Americans, Asian-Americans and the LGBT community make up more than 42 percent of Arizona’s population, but are only represented in 0–2 percent of known archival collections. Learn how to be a Community Archivist for underrepresented communities.

ASU Library staff will show individuals how to appraise, arrange and describe archival material (e.g. photographs or correspondence) in order to preserve it for future generations. Each participant will receive a free “Archive Starter Kit” that contains preservation information and archival supplies (acid-free box, folders, mylar, and gloves).

Archives & Preservation Workshop

Tempe Public Library

3500 S. Rural Road, Tempe, AZ

For More Information Contact:

Nancy Godoy
ASU Library
nancy.godoy@asu.edu

Last Event: Tuesday April 10 5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
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Latinos, African-Americans, Asian-Americans and the LGBT community make up more than 42 percent of Arizona’s population, but are only represented in 0–2 percent of known archival collections. Learn how to be a community archivist for underrepresented communities.

ASU Library staff will show individuals how to appraise, arrange and describe archival material (e.g. photographs or correspondence) in order to preserve it for future generations. Each participant will receive a free “Archive Starter Kit” that contains preservation information and archival supplies (acid-free box, folders, mylar, and gloves).

 

Archives and Preservation Workshop

Mesa Public Library - Main Library

64 E. 1st Street, Mesa, AZ

For More Information Contact:

Nancy Godoy
ASU Library
Nancy.Godoy@asu.edu

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Professor Samuel Liebhaber, Middlebury College

The Mahri language of Southern Arabian is one of the few indigenous, non-Arabic languages remaining on the Arabian Peninsula, and since Mahri is a non-written language, poetry in the Mahri language is a strictly oral art form.

As a result, the process of poetic creation in al-Mahra is guided by a hierarchical series of questions that the poet addresses at the moment of inspiration. I have developed a digital exhibit of Mahri poetry that enables visitors to explore the diversity of poetic expression in al-Mahra and experience the formation of a poem in the moment.

By adopting a web-based medium, the online project challenges the traditional, genre-based classification of Arabian vernacular poetry and encourages the reception of these poems as oral expressions. The talk will outline the theoretical and experiential basis of my research on Mahri poetry as well as provide a demonstration of the digital project, When Melodies Gather (forthcoming, Stanford University Press, Spring 2018).

Coor Hall, room 170

For More Information Contact:

Murphy McGary
School of International letters and Cultures
murphy.mcgary@asu.edu
480-965-4674 http://silc.asu.edu

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How do we prepare for plausible futures that we cannot envision? Inspired by Asimov’s "Foundation," this project will treat public libraries — which communicate to the near and distant future through collection, curated experiences, education and preservation — as institutions whose central purpose is to explore this very question, as well as that of how the future-oriented mission of libraries contributes to disaster readiness and community resiliency.

Through a meta-analysis of how public libraries have functioned in the wake of extreme events, semi-structured interviews, on-site research and the use of scenario-based games and video animation, this project aims to produce a general framework for increasing libraries’ contributions to resilience and refining resilience-related decision-making.

This project combines interviews, literature review and analysis of twitter data (500,000+ tweets) generated around the major hurricanes that made landfall in the United States in 2017. Using these sources, we look for ways that libraries can intervene in the context of natural disasters and other emergencies, as well as analyze what library resources are especially vulnerable.

We also generate a vocabulary of key concepts, resources, persons and institutions for the purposes of scenario models, one of which we produce as a deck of cards.

Michael Simeone and Michael Bennet will present their findings in a short conversation, and follow with refreshments and an opportunity to play through the card-based simulation exercise.

About the speakers

Michael Bennett is an associate research professor in Arizona State University’s School for the Future of Innovation in Society, the Center for Science and the Imagination and the Risk Innovation Lab, as well as a lecturer in the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law. He was formerly an associate professor on the faculty of the Northeastern University School of Law and the Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Science, Technology and Society at Vassar College. He has also held teaching and research positions at the University of Michigan, Michigan Technological University, Polytechnic University and the University of Virginia and has served as adviser to several university offices of technology transfer.

Michael Simeone is the Director of Data Science and Analytics for the Arizona State University Libraries. Before joining the Libraries, he was the founding director of ASU’s Nexus Lab for Digital Humanities and Transdisciplinary Informatics, and the Associate Director of the Institute for Computing in Humanities, Arts, and Social Science at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications. He earned his PhD in English Language and Literature/Letters from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Foundations of Resilience flyer

Ross-Blakley Hall, room 196

For More Information Contact:

Leah Newsom
Institute for Humanities Research
lenewsom@asu.edu
480-965-3787 ihr.asu.edu

Last Event: Thursday March 22 1 p.m. - 2 p.m.
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Please join ASU Library for a talk and Q&A with special guest Samuel Liebhaber, associate professor of Arabic at Middlebury College in Middlebury, Vermont, who will discuss “Oral Histories and Digital Sound Archives: Themes, Concerns and Opportunities.”  

Liebhaber is the author of the “Mahri Poetry Archive,” an online resource for Mahri poetry, society and history, and he has conducted research and fieldwork in Yemen on the poetic traditions of the endangered Mahri language, a poorly documented Semitic language indigenous to Southern Arabia.

Snacks will be served.

Sponsored by the NexusLab, School of International Letters and Cultures, Department of English, CLAS Dean of Humanities, Interdisciplinary Committee on Linguistics and ASU Library.

Samuel Liebhaber

Hayden Library, room C6A

For More Information Contact:

Patty Odle
ASU Library
Patricia.Odle@asu.edu

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